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Lawmakers examine bill to create prescription drug use database | News

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Lawmakers examine bill to create prescription drug use database
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State lawmakers are considering a new legislation that will try to put a stop to prescription drug abuse.  Senate Bill 114 was discussed by the Senate Health and Human Services Committee Monday. It requires pharmacists in Nevada to develop a comprehensive database to keep track of prescription meds given to patients.

Should it get passed, Senate Bill 114 would also give physicians better access to a patient's information in regards to their prescription drug history. Legislatures believe this could help keep doctors from overprescribing.

Recovering prescription drug addict, Angie Johnson said she couldn't make it through the day without the help of pain meds for nearly 10 years.

"I was on Methadone, Morphine, Percocet and Xanax all at the same time, and I was getting the maximum dose,” Johnson said.

Johnson said they were all prescribed to her by her doctor. However, she said it was also a doctor who got her help after noticing she was abusing drugs.

She's been clean for three months now.

Pain specialist Dr. Steven Kozmary says he's in full support of SB 114.

"These addiction problems can be severe and life-changing," Dr. Kozmary said. "The worst thing you can do for a patient who has an addiction problem is not recognize the problem and prescribe them more."

However, not everyone thinks SB 114 is the best solution. One doctor says it could end up putting undue burden on both the patient and the doctor.

"I think we are trying to criminalize medical behaviors,” said Dr. Annette Teijero, Anesthesiologist.

Dr. Teijero said the legislation could make it harder for lawful prescription drugs users to obtain meds and dictate medical decisions that should be made by doctors.

"You can't ask medical doctors to have this magical dosage that works for everybody because it won't” Dr. Teijero said.

The Senate Health and Human Services Committee has until April 10th to make a decision on whether to pass the bill. After that, the bill heads to the full Senate for a final vote.

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